Neuroprosthetic technologies to augment the impact of neurorehabilitation after spinal cord injury.

Rubia van den Brand, Jean-Baptiste Mignardot, Joachim von Zitzewitz, Camille Le Goff, Nicolas Fumeaux, Fabien Wagner, Marco Capogrosso, Eduardo Martin Moraud, Silvestro Micera, Brigitte Schurch, Armin Curt, Stefano Carda, Jocelyne Bloch, Grégoire Courtine
Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine. 2015-09-01; 58(4): 232-237
DOI: 10.1016/j.rehab.2015.04.003

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1. Ann Phys Rehabil Med. 2015 Sep;58(4):232-237. doi: 10.1016/j.rehab.2015.04.003.
Epub 2015 Jun 19.

Neuroprosthetic technologies to augment the impact of neurorehabilitation after
spinal cord injury.

van den Brand R(1), Mignardot JB(2), von Zitzewitz J(2), Le Goff C(2), Fumeaux
N(2), Wagner F(2), Capogrosso M(3), Martin Moraud E(3), Micera S(3), Schurch
B(4), Curt A(5), Carda S(4), Bloch J(4), Courtine G(2).

Author information:
(1)International Paraplegic Foundation Chair in Spinal Cord Repair, Center for
Neuroprosthetics and Brain Mind Institute, School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal
Institute of Technology (EPFL), SV BMI UPCOURTINE, Station 19, CH-1015 Lausanne,
Switzerland. Electronic address: .
(2)International Paraplegic Foundation Chair in Spinal Cord Repair, Center for
Neuroprosthetics and Brain Mind Institute, School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal
Institute of Technology (EPFL), SV BMI UPCOURTINE, Station 19, CH-1015 Lausanne,
Switzerland.
(3)Bertarelli Foundation Chair in Translational Neuroengineering, Center for
Neuroprosthetics and Institute of Bioengineering, School of Bioengineering, Swiss
Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
(4)Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV), Lausanne, Switzerland.
(5)Spinal Cord Injury Center, Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zurich,
Zurich, Switzerland.

Spinal cord injury leads to a range of disabilities, including limitations in
locomotor activity, that seriously diminish the patients’ autonomy and quality of
life. Electrochemical neuromodulation therapies, robot-assisted rehabilitation
and willpower-based training paradigms restored supraspinal control of locomotion
in rodent models of severe spinal cord injury. This treatment promoted extensive
and ubiquitous remodeling of spared circuits and residual neural pathways. In
four chronic paraplegic individuals, electrical neuromodulation of the spinal
cord resulted in the immediate recovery of voluntary leg movements, suggesting
that the therapeutic concepts developed in rodent models may also apply to
humans. Here, we briefly review previous work, summarize current developments,
and highlight impediments to translate these interventions into medical practice
to improve functional recovery of spinal-cord-injured individuals.

Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1016/j.rehab.2015.04.003
PMID: 26100230 [Indexed for MEDLINE]


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