The effect of high-fat diet consumption on appetitive instrumental behavior in rats.

Frédéric Tantot, Shauna L. Parkes, Alain R. Marchand, Chloé Boitard, Fabien Naneix, Sophie Layé, Pierre Trifilieff, Etienne Coutureau, Guillaume Ferreira
Appetite. 2017-01-01; 108: 203-211
DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2016.10.001

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Tantot F(1), Parkes SL(2), Marchand AR(3), Boitard C(1), Naneix F(3), Layé S(1),Trifilieff P(1), Coutureau E(3), Ferreira G(4).

Author information:
(1)INRA, Nutrition et Neurobiologie Intégrée, UMR 1286, Bordeaux, France;
Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France.
(2)INRA, Nutrition et Neurobiologie Intégrée, UMR 1286, Bordeaux, France;
Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut de Neurosciences Cognitives
et Intégratives d’Aquitaine, UMR 5287, Bordeaux, France.
(3)Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France; CNRS, Institut de Neurosciences
Cognitives et Intégratives d’Aquitaine, UMR 5287, Bordeaux, France.
(4)INRA, Nutrition et Neurobiologie Intégrée, UMR 1286, Bordeaux, France;
Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France. Electronic address:
.

Evidence now indicates that the chronic consumption of high-calorie foods, such
as a high-fat diet (HFD), is associated with impaired control over food-seeking,
yet the extent of this alteration is not fully understood. Using different
reinforcement schedules, we evaluated whether HFD intake from weaning to
adulthood modifies instrumental responding and induces a shift from goal-directed
actions to habitual responding. We first observed reduced instrumental
performance and motivation for a food reward in HFD-fed rats trained under
schedules of reinforcement that facilitate habitual responding [Random Interval
(RI)]. However, this deficit was alleviated if rats trained under RI were
subsequently trained with reinforcement schedules that promote goal-directed
strategies [Random Ratio (RR)]. Using an outcome devaluation procedure, we then
demonstrated that consumption of a HFD promoted habitual behavior in rats trained
under RI but not RR schedules. Finally, extended HFD exposure did not interfere
with the ability of RR training to overcome impaired RI instrumental performance
and to favor goal-directed behavior. These results indicate that chronic
consumption of a HFD changes the co-ordination of goal-directed actions and
habits and that alteration of food-seeking may be reversed under particular
behavioral conditions.

Copyright – 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

 


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