The concept of brain plasticity–Paillard’s systemic analysis and emphasis on structure and function (followed by the translation of a seminal paper by Paillard on plasticity).

Bruno Will, John Dalrymple-Alford, Mathieu Wolff, Jean-Christophe Cassel
Behavioural Brain Research. 2008-09-01; 192(1): 2-7
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2007.11.030

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1. Behav Brain Res. 2008 Sep 1;192(1):2-7. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2007.11.030. Epub 2008
Jan 25.

The concept of brain plasticity–Paillard’s systemic analysis and emphasis on
structure and function (followed by the translation of a seminal paper by
Paillard on plasticity).

Will B(1), Dalrymple-Alford J, Wolff M, Cassel JC.

Author information:
(1)LINC, UMR 7191, Université Louis Pasteur-Centre National de la Recherche
Scientifique, IFR des Neurosciences 037, GDR 2905 CNRS, 12 rue Goethe,
Strasbourg, France.

Although rejected for the most part of the 20th Century, the idea of brain
plasticity began to receive wide acceptance from the 1970s. Yet there has been
relatively little theoretical comment on the definition and use of “plasticity”
in the field of neurobiology. An early exception to this lack of critical
reflection on neural plasticity was provided by Jacques Paillard in a seminal
paper that he published in 1976 [Paillard J. Réflexions sur l’usage du concept de
plasticité en neurobiology. J Psychol 1976;1:33-47]. As this valuable
contribution was published in French, the present authors provide an English
adaptation to help convey his ideas to an international audience, together with a
contemporary commentary on this paper. Paillard’s definition of the term
“plasticity” is probably as pertinent today as it was 30 years ago, especially in
terms of its relevance to multiple levels of analysis of brain function
(molecular, cellular, systemic). Sadly, Jacques Paillard died in 2006; our
comments therefore also include a brief biographical tribute to this outstanding
neuroscientist.

DOI: 10.1016/j.bbr.2007.11.030
PMID: 18222008 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

Auteurs Bordeaux Neurocampus