Responses to novelty and vulnerability to cocaine addiction: contribution of a multi-symptomatic animal model.

D. Belin, V. Deroche-Gamonet
Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine. 2012-11-01; 2(11): a011940-a011940
DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a011940

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1. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med. 2012 Nov 1;2(11). pii: a011940. doi:
10.1101/cshperspect.a011940.

Responses to novelty and vulnerability to cocaine addiction: contribution of a
multi-symptomatic animal model.

Belin D(1), Deroche-Gamonet V.

Author information:
(1)INSERM U, Laboratoire de Neurosciences Expérimentales et Cliniques, Group
Psychobiology of Compulsive Disorders, Université de Poitiers, France.

Epidemiological studies have revealed striking associations between several
distinct behavioral/personality traits and drug addiction, with a large emphasis
on the sensation-seeking trait and the associated impulsive dimension of
personality. However, in human studies, it is difficult to identify whether
personality/behavioral traits actually contribute to increased vulnerability to
drug addiction or reflect psychobiological adaptations to chronic drug exposure.
Here we show how animal models, including the first multi-symptomatic model of
addiction in the rat, have contributed to a better understanding of the
relationships between different subdimensions of the sensation-seeking trait and
different stages of the development of cocaine addiction, from vulnerability to
initiation of cocaine self-administration to the transition to compulsive drug
intake. We argue that sensation seeking predicts vulnerability to use cocaine,
whereas novelty seeking, akin to high impulsivity, predicts instead vulnerability
to shift from controlled to compulsive cocaine use, that is, addiction.

DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a011940
PMCID: PMC3543096
PMID: 23125204 [Indexed for MEDLINE]


Auteurs Bordeaux Neurocampus