Endocannabinoid modulation of homeostatic and non-homeostatic feeding circuits.

Benjamin K. Lau, Daniela Cota, Luigia Cristino, Stephanie L. Borgland
Neuropharmacology. 2017-09-01; 124: 38-51
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.05.033

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1. Neuropharmacology. 2017 Sep 15;124:38-51. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.05.033.
Epub 2017 Jun 1.

Endocannabinoid modulation of homeostatic and non-homeostatic feeding circuits.

Lau BK(1), Cota D(2), Cristino L(3), Borgland SL(4).

Author information:
(1)Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Calgary, 3330
Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada.
(2)INSERM U1215, Université de Bordeaux, NeuroCentre Magendie, 146, rue Léo
Saignat, 33077 Bordeaux, France.
(3)Endocannabinoid Research Group, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry of CNR,
Viale Campi Flegrei, 34, 80078 Pozzuoli, Napoli, Italy.
(4)Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Calgary, 3330
Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 4N1, Canada. Electronic address:
.

The endocannabinoid system has emerged as a key player in the control of eating.
Endocannabinoids, including 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA),
modulate neuronal activity via cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) in multiple nuclei
of the hypothalamus to induce or inhibit food intake depending on nutritional and
hormonal status, suggesting that endocannabinoids may act in the hypothalamus to
integrate different types of signals informing about the animal’s energy needs.
In the mesocorticolimbic system, (endo)cannabinoids modulate synaptic
transmission to promote dopamine release in response to palatable food. In
addition, (endo)cannabinoids act within the nucleus accumbens to increase food’s
hedonic impact; although this effect depends on activation of CB1Rs at
excitatory, but not inhibitory inputs in the nucleus accumbens. While
hyperactivation of the endocannabinoid system is typically associated with
overeating and obesity, much evidence has emerged in recent years suggesting a
more complicated system than first thought – endocannabinoids promote or suppress
feeding depending on cell and input type, or modulation by various neuronal or
hormonal signals. This review presents our latest knowledge of the
endocannabinoid system in non-homeostatic and homeostatic feeding circuits. In
particular, we discuss the functional role and cellular mechanism of action by
endocannabinoids within the hypothalamus and mesocorticolimbic system, and how
these are modulated by neuropeptide signals related to feeding. In light of
recent advances and complexity in the field, we review cannabinoid-based
therapeutic strategies for the treatment of obesity and how peripheral
restriction of CB1R antagonists may provide a different mechanism of weight loss
without the central adverse effects. This article is part of the Special Issue
entitled « A New Dawn in Cannabinoid Neurobiology ».

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.05.033
PMID: 28579186 [Indexed for MEDLINE]


Auteurs Bordeaux Neurocampus