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Séminaire impromptu - Timothy CarrollThe effects of action history on force direction depend upon movement preparation time.

Abstract :


 I will describe a project that considers how the manner in which people have moved previously to complete physical tasks influences the characteristics of their future movements.
Movement history appears to influence both the types of movement we choose to make in a given situation (e.g. whether a tennis player tends to prefer serve to wide or to the body), and the details of selected movements (e.g. the joint kinematics that influence the speed of the serve).
In the laboratory, it has been shown that when trying to move towards a specific location in the environment, people tend to make aiming errors toward the direction of recently executed movements. This has been interpreted as a simple use-dependent effect, due to potentiation of neural elements involved in movement execution. However, in paradigms in which there are multiple potential targets, and when the particular target that needs to be selected on a given trial is uncertain until just before people are cued to move, they typically aim towards a location that is intermediate between the alterative options.
This suggests that people might use movement history to predict the action most likely to be next required. It is currently unclear to what extent systematic aiming errors due to prediction of the next required action, versus simple repetition effects, represent overlapping neural control processes. In this talk, I will describe a series of experiments in which we controlled the amount of time people had to prepare their movements, and in which sequences of movements were required, to dissociate aiming errors due to recent movement history from errors that reflect the next most likely action.

The results illustrate that “use-dependent” and “action prediction” biases are experimentally separable, suggesting that they rely on different neural mechanisms.

Selected publications

Neural adaptations associated with interlimb transfer in a ballistic wrist flexion task. Ruddy, Kathy L., Rudolf, Anne K., Kalkman, Barbara, King, Maedbh, Daffertshofer, Andreas, Carroll, Timothy J. and Carson, Richard G. (2016) Neural adaptations associated with interlimb transfer in a ballistic wrist flexion task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10 204: 1-18. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00204


Motor adaptations to pain during a bilateral plantarflexion task: Does the cost of using the non-painful limb matter? Hug, Francois, Hodges, Paul W., Carroll, Timothy J., De Martino, Enrico, Magnard, Justine and Tucker, Kylie (2016) Motor adaptations to pain during a bilateral plantarflexion task: Does the cost of using the non-painful limb matter?. Plos One, 11 4: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0154524

 

Electric and acoustic stimulation during movement preparation can facilitate movement execution in healthy participants and stroke survivors.  Marinovic, Welber, Brauer, Sandra G., Hayward, Kathryn S., Carroll, Timothy J. and Riek, Stephan (2016) Electric and acoustic stimulation during movement preparation can facilitate movement execution in healthy participants and stroke survivors. Neuroscience Letters, 618 134-138. doi:10.1016/j.neulet.2016.03.009