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Conférence mensuelle - Oscar MarinCellular and molecular mechanisms controlling the development of cortical interneurons

Abstract :

The neural assembly underlying the formation of functional networks in the cerebral cortex constitutes one of the most complex neuronal systems in the brain. Much of this complexity arises during development through the interaction of two distinct neuronal types, glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons.

Pyramidal cells constitute approximately 80% of the neurons in the cortex and they specialize in transmitting information between different cortical regions and to other regions of the brain. Interneurons comprise a highly heterogeneous group of neurons that primarily contribute to local assemblies, where they provide inhibitory inputs and they shape different forms of synchronized oscillations.

Our research largely concentrates on the analysis of the mechanisms controlling the the migration, final allocation and connectivity of cortical interneurons, although we are also interested in understanding the general principles regulating the development of other classes of cortical neurons. We believe that our research may contribute to understanding the etiology of some of the most devastating psychiatric disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia.

Selected publications

Marín, O. (2012) Interneuron dysfunction in psychiatric disorders. Nat. Rev. Neurosci., 13, 107-120.

Sánchez-Alcaniz, J.A., Haege, S., Mueller, W., Pla, R., Mackay, F., Schulz, S., Lopez-Bendito, G., Stumm, R. & Marín, O. (2011) Cxcr7 controls neuronal migration by regulating chemokine responsiveness. Neuron, 69, 77-90.

Fazzari, P., Paternain, A.V., Valiente, M., Pla, R., Lujan, R., Lloyd, K., Lerma, J., Marin, O. & Rico, B. (2010) Control of cortical GABA circuitry development by Nrg1 and ErbB4 signalling. Nature, 464, 1376-1380.

Scientific focus :

The neural assembly underlying the formation of functional networks in the cerebral cortex constitutes one of the most complex neuronal systems in the brain. Much of this complexity arises during development through the interaction of two distinct neuronal types, glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons.

Pyramidal cells constitute approximately 80% of the neurons in the cortex and they specialize in transmitting information between different cortical regions and to other regions of the brain. Interneurons comprise a highly heterogeneous group of neurons that primarily contribute to local assemblies, where they provide inhibitory inputs and they shape different forms of synchronized oscillations.

Our research largely concentrates on the analysis of the mechanisms controlling the the migration, final allocation and connectivity of cortical interneurons, although we are also interested in understanding the general principles regulating the development of other classes of cortical neurons. We believe that our research may contribute to understanding the etiology of some of the most devastating psychiatric disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia. Below you will find more information on our current research

Oscar Marín was born in Madrid in 1971. He graduated in Biological Sciences from the Universidad Complutense (Madrid, Spain) in 1993, where he also obtained his Doctoral Degree in 1997 (Extraordinary award and European mention). He subsequently joined the University of California in San Francisco as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of John L. R. Rubenstein. In 2003, he took a group leader position at the Instituto de Neurociencias in Alicante (Spain), where he is currently a Full Professor for the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC).

Oscar Marín receives the 2012 FENS/EJN Young Investigator Award

He has received numerous Awards and recognitions, such as EMBO (European Molecular Biology Organization) Young Investigator (2003), NARSAD Young Investigator (2000 and 2004), and European Young Investigator (EURYI) Awards (2004), Banco Sabadell Award for Biomedical Research (2008), Rey Jaime I Award on Basic Research (2011), and the FENS/EJN Young Investigator Award.

Oscar Marín serves in several editorial boards, and he is currently a member of the Board of Reviewing Editors at Science. In 2005, Oscar Marín was selected as one of the 22 founding members of the Scientific Council of the European Research Council, where he served until 2010.

Laurent Groc - Mireille Montcouquiol

Conférence labellisées formation doctorale neurosciences

Conférence animées par les doctorants
Les étudiants n'ont pas à s'inscrire pour participer à ces conférences. Elles se déroulent en anglais et sont bien entendu ouvertes à tous (à toutes les disciplines même hors neurosciences). Un lunch cloture la conférence (discussion avec l'invité), ll est ouvert sur inscription (4 jours à l'avance auprès de Claire Biard "claire-helene.biard@u-bordeaux2.fr". (Free entrance, registration only if lunch with the speaker)